Music Metrics Vault

New jersey underground rap

Most popular artists in New jersey underground rap

This chart is based on the monthly listeners metric for all artists tagged with the genre new jersey underground rap by Spotify. It may contain some errors or some data may not be up to date. You can check the artist profile to update data if necessary.

# Artist Monthly Listeners Followers
1
20,688,243
805,502
2
B Jack$
1,160,383
6,064
3
Bandmanrill
473,197
69,364
4
Chris Patrick
169,769
33,813
5
Lady London
158,189
64,519
6
Amaru Cloud
126,713
8,610
7
Mir Fontane
102,466
26,578
8
Albee Al
99,104
36,397
9
Tsu Surf
97,768
52,104
10
Tdot illdude
54,514
12,660
11
Don Michael Jr
50,053
17,055
12
G Skino
44,653
663
13
Drose
37,076
10,570
14
pineappleCITI
33,337
5,363
15
Lil Dev
32,575
5,013
16
Mike Zombie
28,968
9,727
17
Samad Savage
26,253
17,782
18
Wiseboy Jeremy
24,458
4,748
19
Prophet the Artist
24,060
9,584
20
$tories
23,693
23,944
21
Chase Fetti
21,915
5,425
22
Cruch Calhoun
18,609
23,830
23
Franky Hill
17,829
982
24
Daidough
16,723
3,972
25
Arsonal da Rebel
15,504
17,354
26
Rek Banga
9,104
24,150
27
Tennisboywill
6,869
2,851
28
Max YB
5,901
1,871
29
Mulaa'bossedup
5,526
2,037
30
Mene Gene
5,095
622
31
MG Ant
4,828
233
32
iThump
4,731
1,020
33
GUNHEAD
4,670
1,316
34
Drok
4,528
1,000
35
Big Moose 280
4,366
1,552
36
Jay Griffy
3,970
10,899
37
POPPY O
3,611
349
38
Chuckyy_103
2,852
1,779
39
Elzo Bandz
2,833
2,727
40
Trey Twizz
2,706
1,576
41
Bigga Don
2,664
1,458
42
Bundles FVG
2,480
1,604
43
Mir Pesos
2,122
477
44
13magzz
2,054
39
45
Henny Blanco
1,756
740
46
GMGB Dooski
1,703
745
47
Bennie Bates
1,508
4,166
48
Hadii Bandzz
1,492
268
49
ZaizzyG
1,403
1,127
50
Rackboy Cam
1,358
83,782
51
90Rackss
1,293
1,522
52
Torchh
1,272
971
53
Mike Marroko
1,146
730
54
Gatti800
1,145
415
55
Lil Tokyo Drip
1,115
420
56
L4m Maine
1,104
183
57
DamnGirll
1,044
244
58
Quil 2x
1,008
123
59
Marty Rantzen
1,000
207
60
TerrorG
567
406
61
ZoBali
481
208
62
Daduh.Gg
448
275
63
Zay Flamez
351
624
64
Loso
324
43
65
Juice Potter
283
77
66
Fucccdat
278
479
67
KING VAMP
269
228
68
Terror G
264
116
69
Bgreedy
260
35
70
Prince Hill
242
256
71
Fso Neph
220
176
72
Gotti HBK
219
42
73
HeIsMellowD
204
183
74
MrCashedOut
201
191
75
Ca$h K
184
89
76
Flexx Fargo
139
17
77
BigOpp
139
186
78
Jadee 5ive7
131
214
79
Gunzalo
130
107
80
Ken Love
122
412
81
Wild Milly
103
152
82
Glomanie
97
126
83
Dre Skuffs
91
344
84
Gee Rose
90
139
85
Sumu
83
253
86
Cel Escobar
69
76
87
Nyah G
64
346
88
Qwannyyy
52
91
89
Mbfrico
42
45
90
40?
40
9
91
GetRightSour
40
129
92
Quilo
39
135
93
Tunezzup!
27
136
94
Jugmanxo
27
57
95
Shaq Wood$
25
478
96
Sonny Breeze
23
120
97
Jerseys Connect
16
51
98
La Vetti Raw
16
33

Some info about new jersey underground rap

New Jersey has been a vital hotbed for hip-hop since the genre's inception, but its distinctive underground rap scene has carved out a unique niche in the broader cultural landscape. Characterized by its gritty realism, lyrical complexity, and an unwavering commitment to authenticity, New Jersey underground rap distinguishes itself from its New York neighbors with a raw, unfiltered voice that reflects the Garden State’s diverse and often stark urban realities.

The roots of New Jersey underground rap can be traced back to the late 1980s and early 1990s, a period marked by the emergence of hip-hop as a form of social and political expression. New Jersey's proximity to New York City meant that it was inevitably influenced by the burgeoning hip-hop scenes in boroughs like the Bronx and Brooklyn. However, New Jersey artists brought their own flavor, drawing on local experiences and issues to shape a sound that was distinctly their own. This era saw the rise of artists like Redman from Newark, who became one of the defining voices of East Coast hip-hop with his witty, freestyle-influenced lyricism and his affiliation with the Def Squad.

As the genre matured in the 2000s, a new wave of artists continued to push the boundaries of New Jersey underground rap. Artists such as Joe Budden, hailing from Jersey City, gained prominence not only for their lyrical prowess but also for their deep introspection and vulnerability in their music—a trait that has become a hallmark of the New Jersey rap aesthetic. Budden’s 2003 hit “Pump It Up” earned him national acclaim, but his deeper, more personal tracks resonate strongly within the underground community.

Today, the scene thrives with a blend of old-school influences and new sounds. Progressive artists like Fetty Wap—who integrates melodic, almost singing-like rap—and the sharp lyricism of Ransom are currently at the forefront, drawing national attention. They continue the tradition of storytelling with a distinctive New Jersey grit, infused increasingly with crossover appeal due to the changing dynamics of the music industry and listener tastes.

While distinctly American, the influence of New Jersey underground rap can be felt internationally, particularly in urban centers in Canada, the United Kingdom, and parts of Western Europe, where there is a strong appreciation for the raw, emotional, and unpolished delivery of underground hip-hop. This transatlantic exchange has been bolstered by the internet, allowing New Jersey artists to reach a global audience eager for narratives that diverge from mainstream rap themes.

Fueling its underground scene is a robust network of local clubs, live music venues, and grassroots organizations dedicated to nurturing emerging talent. Venues like the legendary Stone Pony in Asbury Park, though more famously associated with rock music, have been instrumental in giving rap artists a platform. Community events and battles continue to be a staple, preserving the competitive and communal spirit that is essential to hip-hop.

As a genre, New Jersey underground rap remains a dynamic and evolving form of artistic expression. With its blend of insightful lyricism, gritty soundscapes, and the undying spirit of resilience and resistance, it stands as a powerful testament to the enduring influence of one of America's most overlooked musical landscapes.