Music Metrics Vault

Trinibad

Most popular artists in Trinibad

This chart is based on the monthly listeners metric for all artists tagged with the genre trinibad by Spotify. It may contain some errors or some data may not be up to date. You can check the artist profile to update data if necessary.

# Artist Monthly Listeners Followers
1
12,661,568
385,574
2
Teejay
831,511
223,973
3
Prince Swanny
363,213
123,436
4
Boy Boy
252,841
31,094
5
Nailah Blackman
235,999
38,081
6
Squash
218,073
180,072
7
Rebel Sixx
75,068
54,461
8
Hey Choppi
64,629
4,505
9
Zerimar
56,597
32,329
10
Plumpy Boss
47,758
29,112
11
Boidingo
39,395
6,232
12
K Lion
37,710
42,954
13
Medz Boss
35,548
36,887
14
Trinidad Ghost
33,662
2,823
15
Jahllano
28,963
21,268
16
Icee Dan
24,111
8,577
17
Toby Boss Ent
23,443
6,655
18
Zebee
18,602
3,393
19
Kalonji
17,992
36,520
20
Going Global Records
17,114
11,013
21
Rheon Elbourne
16,216
4,306
22
Tech Sounds
15,019
1,966
23
Wacko Dan
14,506
24,168
24
Coutain
13,217
2,136
25
Tafari
10,133
27,522
26
Young Star 6ixx
7,699
17,976
27
Tefflon
6,886
20,577
28
Tejah
6,647
3,705
29
Yung Choppa
5,701
8,953
30
Bobby 6ix
5,035
18,602
31
Lawless
4,285
6,150
32
Raskality
3,787
5,970
33
Rondo
3,231
4,272
34
Tafari
3,089
7,230
35
Rebel 6
2,733
1,903
36
Logiq
2,386
1,413
37
KellyBeatz
1,767
1,728
38
Mad Daag6
1,658
447
39
Trigger Dan
1,646
1,771
40
Tokeii
1,551
2,277
41
Pablo Dan
1,497
2,759
42
CJ Dan
1,326
7,362
43
Toppy Boss
1,281
4,225
44
K Lion
1,274
3,262
45
2k Zelle
1,273
517
46
Kyler
1,220
671
47
Jovi Ton
1,123
3,773
48
Toppy Boss
1,089
7,343
49
Jza King
1,081
446
50
Gskell
1,023
4,435
51
Boogie and G5
900
2,585
52
Boogie
582
1,932
53
LRG
480
1,074
54
Chucky
320
1,618
55
Leo King
299
1,241
56
Asim
274
367
57
KG
253
186
58
Toppy Boss
253
852
59
Jp.
213
94
60
Tech Sounds
175
360
61
Brad & Vers
111
559
62
Fari Dan
106
593
63
One6
103
142
64
Fari Dan
88
360
65
Ice Dan
78
1,265
66
Bobby Sixx
75
643
67
Riima Dan
71
47
68
Toppy Boss
70
1,756
69
BOYO
70
515
70
Rebel 6ix
52
1,863
71
Melo Dan
14
431

Some info about trinibad

Trinibad, a sub-genre of dancehall music, embodies a gritty, raw evolution of the popular sound but with a unique distinction: it originates from Trinidad and Tobago. Trinibad started to gain prominence around 2019, marking a significant shift in the Caribbean music scene traditionally dominated by genres like soca and calypso. The term itself combines "Trini," referring to Trinidadian, and "bad," a dancehall slang term that denotes something as tough, rebellious, or audaciously excellent.

Trinibad emerged from the streets of Trinidad, specifically in areas known for their tough reputations like Laventille and Enterprise. The genre reflects the struggles, tales, and daily realities of its creators. Lyrically, Trinibad songs often discuss topics such as survival in harsh socio-economic conditions, loyalty, and street justice, themes that resonate deeply with the youth demographic. The sound is distinct for its deep, bass-heavy beats, slower tempos compared to traditional dancehall, and a darker, almost haunting atmospheric quality that mirrors the often grim narratives.

Key artists who have contributed significantly to the rise and popularity of Trinibad include Prince Swanny, who is widely regarded as one of the pioneers and leading figures in the genre. His tracks like "Tell Me" and "Dreams" have not only dominated local charts but have also garnered substantial views and streams on platforms like YouTube and Spotify, helping to internationalize the genre. Other notable artists in the Trinibad scene include Boy Boy, Plumpy Boss, and Rebel Sixx, the latter tragically deceased, which brought a somber highlight to the scene, underscoring the sometimes-dangerous milieu from which this music emerges.

Trinibad's popularity, while most concentrated in Trinidad and Tobago, has spilled over into various parts of the Caribbean and among diaspora communities in places like Toronto, New York, and London. These global connections are not just a testimony to the mobility of Caribbean people but also to the universal appeal of the music's raw emotional pull and compelling rhythms.

In addition to the music itself, Trinibad culture encompasses a specific aesthetic that includes fashion choices like dark, rugged clothing and accessories that enhance the "bad" persona. Similarly, the music videos tend to feature visuals that are stark, often shot in black and white or muted colors, enhancing the gritty lyrical content.

Despite its growing popularity, Trinibad has not been without controversy. Due to its often explicit content and portrayal of street life, it has faced criticism from various sectors including older generations and cultural purists who feel it may promote negative stereotypes or behaviors. However, proponents argue that Trinibad, like many other forms of expressive culture, simply reflects existing societal issues and offers a voice to an otherwise marginalized youth population.

Trinibad continues to evolve, with artists experimenting with blending elements of other genres such as trap and afrobeats, indicating that while it is deeply rooted in Trinidadian culture, its dynamic nature might redefine Caribbean music influence worldwide. As it continues to rise, Trinibad not only highlights the complexity and versatility of Caribbean musical artistry but also showcases the unfiltered and poignant narratives of its people.

This genre is a testament to how localized cultural expressions can garner global resonance, making a mark in the broad, diverse landscape of world music. For music enthusiasts, Trinibad offers a fresh, immersive sonic experience rooted in the specificities of Trinidadian life and larger Caribbean contexts.